Monday, February 20, 2012

Amazing facts about amphibians

  • Some frogs can be frozen solid, then thawed, and continue living.
  • Some frogs can pull their eyes into their throat and help push food down!
  • Frogs live on all continents except Antarctica.
  • Wood frogs can be frozen solid and then thawed, and continue living. They use the glucose in their body to protect their vital organs while they are in a frozen state.
  • When threatened, the horned toad shoots blood from its eyes.
  • The Poison Arrow frog has enough poison stored in it that it can harm 2,200 people at one go. 
  • Frogs cannot vomit. Whenever a frog absolutely has to vomit, it vomits its entire stomach. 
  • Unlike a frog a toad cannot jump.
  • There is a substance in the skin of the African clawed frog that helps in fighting infection.
  • The sound made by the toadfish when mating underwater is so loud that it can be heard by humans on the shore.
  • The smallest frog is the "Brazilian baby frog", which is smaller than a dime.
  • The mating call of a male toadfish, which are underwater, is so loud that it can be heard by humans above water.
  • The fire-bellied toad has a bright red belly that it displays to predators as a defense mechanism. It is also a warning that the toad's skin is poisonous.
  • The Spring peeper (a frog) can survive the winter season with 65% of its body water as ice.
  • In 1864, A Quebec farmer found a frog inside a hailstone.
  • Frogs do not need to drink water as they absorb the water through their skin.
  • Found in Argentina, the ornate horned frog can eat an entire mouse with one swallow.
  • An adult "Gold Frog" measures to be 9.8 millimeters in body length.
  • The bee frog of Africa is no bigger than a bee.
  • Frogs start their lives as 'eggs' often lay in or near fresh water.
  • The smallest frog is less than 3/8 of an inch in length.
  • The largest frog in the world is called Goliath frog.
  • Frogs belong to a group of animals called amphibians.
  • Flying frogs change color in the day. They are greenish-blue in sunlight and green in the evening. At night there are black.

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